MCTC Provides Stop the Bleed training for Rural Physician Leadership Program | MCTC

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MCTC Provides Stop the Bleed training for Rural Physician Leadership Program

March 17, 2020

By Mary Morris

Jeff Stevens and Jacob Meece providing Stop the Bleed training.Maysville Community and Technical College is partnering with the University of Kentucky College of Medicine’s Rural Physician Leadership Program to provide Stop the Bleed (STB) training to medical field students. Training is being conducted by Jeff Stevens, MCTC Operations Manager, who is working with fourth-year medical student Jacob Meece to bring students from the Rural Physician Leadership Program to campus. STB is a campaign developed by The American College of Surgeons to better prepare the public to provide first aid procedures in emergency situations, specifically to stop life-threatening bleeding.

The Rural Physician Leadership Program is focused in St. Claire Regional Medical Center and surrounding clinics in the Rowan County area, allowing MCTC’s Rowan Campus to fulfill this educational need. The most recent session was held on March 6, 2020. Stevens, certified to administer the training since 2018, says, “Knowing what to do in an emergency until professional help arrives could save your own life and others.”

Participants learn to identify life-threatening bleeding, how to pack a wound, apply pressure to a wound, and correctly use a tourniquet. “Young students in health professions . . . will serve as the future health care leaders in our communities and must have a working knowledge of basic hemorrhage control,” Meece said. “This initiative is specifically important in rural communities where clinics, remote access hospitals and emergency departments must address urgent healthcare needs without proper resources.”

Stop the Bleed training instructors with students and their certificates.More than fifty students have been awarded certificates since Meece began bringing groups to the Rowan Campus for training with Stevens. Meece states that there has been increased interest from regional campuses in offering tourniquet training as a result of the program. The Rural Physician Leadership Program is in the process of purchasing tourniquets to train incoming classes. Meece is also pursuing formal research with the University of Kentucky College of Medicine to establish the need for tourniquet training for medical students and to integrate STB training into their curriculum. He says that none of this would be possible without the aid of Stevens and MCTC.

For more information on Stop the Bleed training visit www.stopthebleed.org. For more information about training available at MCTC, contact Jeff Stevens at 606-783-1538 ext. 66356 or email, jeff.stevens@kctcs.edu